Irritable Bowel Syndrome Associated With Fructose Intolerance

BASICS

  • At least 50 percent of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have a Fructose intolerance.
  • Inflammatory gut disease, Gluten sensitivity and Coeliac disease is increasing beyond that expected for diagnostic improvements.
  • Our Gut Flora is dependent on our diet
IDEAS around Inflammation

The consumption of Sugar and Polyunsaturated Seed Oils combine in our diet to create inflammation in every blood vessel wall and in every tissue in every organ of the body. The inflammatory process makes everything susceptible to damage and disease. The bowel is no different.

‘Leaky’ Bowel Wall

Could our initial sensitivity be related to the inflammatory process (Fructose and Polyunsaturated Fats) that we have set up over a long time. This allows a susceptible individual to be exposed to other stimuli which continue the process.

This low grade chronic inflammatory state in the bowel walls may increase the “leakage” of the gut lining which has been associated with Coeliac disease. It is hard to imagine that we have just had an increase in the disease rather than something else potentially contributing to it.

It may mean more antigens are crossing in to our blood streams and being associated with our immunity, allergy profile and overall wellness profile.

Coeliac Disease, Gluten Sensitivities and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

These conditions are showing an increasing incidence in society and well beyond just a diagnostic ability aspect.

I have a theory that the ‘Perfect Storm’ of Fructose and Polyunsaturated Fat combine to create a chronic inflammation in the walls of every artery in every organ of the body. You will keep hearing me come back to this basic scenario.

Low grade inflammation of the intestinal wall may lead to a ‘leaky’ bowel (and I don’t mean at the tail end!). This allows the ingestion and exposure of some substances (antigens) that our bodies normally process differently. These antigens then have the capacity to create ‘allergic’ responses and our sensitivities change. Not all of these sensitivities are permanent.

It appears that up to half of Irritable Bowel Syndrome individuals have a Fructose intolerance.

For some Gluten sensitive patients it might be worth getting rid of the Fructose load for some months and then when inflammation has theoretically settled, gently reintroducing the Gluten. This is obviously a generalisation and individuals should seek specific advice from their doctor.

FODMAP can be hard going but works as a good elimination diet. As above, I wonder if part of our initial sensitivity is related to the inflammatory process (Fructose and Polyunsaturated Fats) that we have set up over a long time. Certainly minimising the Fructose and Polyunsaturated Fats seems to be a sustainable lifestyle. All ‘food’ for thought

We are theoretically against the highly processed grains, flours etc and try and minimise them.

As Hunter Gatherers we have been eating grains (unprocessed) for thousands of years and evolved accordingly. We see that the big problem is the amount and frequency of sugar, polyunsaturated fat and highly processed food as being the problem.

At a biochemical level we feel that the biggest issue is the Fructose. The other components just compound the issue.

On discussion with gastroenterology colleagues, it appears that at least 50 percent of patients with irritable bowel syndrome have a Fructose intolerance.

It is considered that there may be a low-grade chronic inflammation in the bowel wall, which not only creates irritability and inflammation in the bowel wall, it also increases the permeability of the bowel wall. That is then possibly associated with the introduction of more foreign material into the blood stream and possibly being related to our overall allergy profile in society increasing.

The consumption of Sugar and Polyunsaturated Seed Oils combine in our diet to create inflammation in every blood vessel wall and in every tissue in every organ of the body. The inflammatory process makes everything susceptible to damage and disease.

Many people struggle with poor gut health. If you are one of these people then stop struggling and look at seeking nutritional support through one of your services.